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Circular Walks in the Black Mountains

Manylion a Disgrifiad y Llyfr | Book Details & Description

  • ISBN: 9781845240936
  • Author: Nick Jenkins
  • Publication April 2009
  • Format: Paperback, 183x123 mm, 112 pages

An interesting collection of graded circular walks in the Black Mountains, comprising clear directions and maps, including information on folklore and religion, local history and nature, together with a highly informative introductory chapter to the area. 16 maps. Published originally in July 2006.

Gwales Review
A keen walker and landscape photographer with a passion for the Brecon Beacons, Nick Jenkins introduces the reader to 15 circular walks in an area which remains relatively unknown and untrampled. Separated from the higher peaks in the National Park by the valley of the Usk, the Black Mountains (not to be confused with Mynydd Du, the Black Mountain to the west) are to be found in the east of the park and cross over the Welsh border at the eastern most edge. They offer a wonderful variety of walking terrain including green valleys, wooded slopes and sustained ridge walking – 3 of the walks include sections of the Offa’s Dyke path.

The author takes us through a brief history of the area from the first Neolithic settlers, to the arrival of the so-called ‘Beaker’ people in around 1700 BC through to the establishment of Llanthoney Priory in the twelfth century, before offering a concise account of the region’s geology and wildlife.

The walks themselves, each with historical points of interest described along the way are carefully chosen to suit most abilities. They range from the easiest level using paths and bridleways, such as the four-mile walk around Grwyne Fechan, through to more moderate eight- to nine-mile routes with some steep ascents and on to the higher level, more challenging and strenuous walks such as the ten-mile climb up to moorland at 1800 ft and the summit at Crug Mawr as well as ‘A Hike up to the Highspot’, a nine-mile circular starting and finishing in the remote hamlet of Capel-y-ffin.

The author’s lively and humorous style make this both an appealing and informative read, something definitely worth packing in your rucksack before you set out.

Jane MacNamee