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Delphic Voyage and Other Poems, The (Corgi Series: 9)

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Manylion a Disgrifiad y Llyfr | Book Details & Description

  • ISBN: 9780863817090
  • Author: Raymond Garlick
  • Publication October 2003
  • Format: Paperback, 103x148 mm, 90 pages

A pocket-size selection of 37 poems by the poet, editor and critic whose works are formal, urbane, scholarly and meticulous in style .

Gwales Review
Raymond Garlick was educated at the University College of North Wales, Bangor, where he converted to Catholicism. He has worked as an editor, a critic and a poet and his approach to writing is formal, scholarly and thoughtful.

He is an Englishman who, without renouncing his own nationality, has a fiercely Nationalistic view of Wales where he has lived for much of his life. The first poem, ‘Point of Departure’, speaks of his love for his adopted country. The reader can tell that this is a love song from his 'clumsy heart' for a country that has truly got under his skin.

This is a collection of poems in which Raymond Garlick embraces the bilingual nature of Welsh language and culture in poems such as ‘Explanatory Note’ and ‘Bilingualism’, and in ‘Consider Kyffin’ he mourns the fact that much of the English-language writing of Wales is not cherished and has been forgotten.

These poems are demanding. Their vocabulary stretches the knowledge of the reader and opens up new textures, vistas, and emotions. They are intricately crafted and it takes time to read them and digest their contents. However, much of the subject matter is accessible. Garlick writes of his childhood, of the things that matter most to him, and of his travels round Europe and the years he spent living in Holland.

Why not start with ‘Capitals’ to get your first taste of Garlick's love of rhyme within a familiar context? Then move on to the Welsh love songs, ‘Point of Departure’ and ‘Traeth Llansteffan’; the last is illustrated on the cover by Jonah Jones. Enjoy the wry humour of ‘Waterloo’ and ‘The Commuter’ and, once these have whetted your appetite, peruse the rest at your leisure.

Catriona Jackson