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Gates of Hell, The

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Manylion a Disgrifiad y Llyfr | Book Details & Description

  • ISBN: 9780863818523
  • Author: Geraint V. Jones
  • Publication October 2003
  • Format: Paperback, 148x210 mm, 313 pages

A powerful science fiction novel about the mixed fortunes of two individuals in the weeks leading up to the collision of an asteroid with earth, and afterwards their struggle to cope with a strange and hostile world.

Gwales Review
‘Transmission had been lost, but not before viewers had heard the NASA voice in Cleveland, Ohio, blurt out in whispered tones words that would remain with them for the rest of their lives – “God help us all! The gates of Hell are now wide open!”’

Geraint Jones’s novel, The Gates of Hell, gives us a spine-chilling account of life in a North Wales village before and after a rogue asteroid of immense dimensions falls on Antarctica. In Part 1 of the book, Jones introduces us to the village of Pencraig and the geography of the surrounding countryside. We are slowly introduced to the central characters; the pace struggles until well into Part 2 when quite suddenly I found myself totally engrossed, and indeed could not put the book down until the last paragraph had been read.

The Gates of Hell gives us more than a glimpse into the human psyche when adversity falls. The weak, the strong, David and Goliath – we are taken through the depths of human despair, depravity and anarchy, together with love, compassion and steadfastness, to new life itself. The hero is Craig O’Darcy, who survives the course, mainly thanks to his estranged step-brother; Craig comes to realise the importance of family. Strong bonds are formed, strong enemies made.

Jones brings into his fiction a moral tone, which opens itself to interesting debate: the philosophy of life as a new state emerges in the aftermath of such devastation.

This is not a book I would regard as pure science fiction; the story is too real and contemporary, with the recent tsunami tragedy in our minds. It is a book worthy of being read.

Norma Penfold