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The Dream (Stories of Welsh Life)

Manylion a Disgrifiad y Llyfr | Book Details & Description

  • Publication Date 2006
  • Illustrated by James Field
  • Suitable for age 9-11 or Key Stage 2
  • Format: Hardback, 207x140 mm, 29 pages

A story and picture book aimed at children aged 9-11 years old. The series deals with many periods in Welsh history, and bases a story on a particular field. This story is about Owain Glyndwr and his history as prince of Wales.

Gwales Review

With the Stories of Welsh Life Series, Gwasg Carreg Gwalch has taken a fresh approach to Welsh history tales for children aged between 8 and 12. Having self-explanatory titles and being written from the point of view of the young main character, the reader is immediately engaged in key events and their effect on ordinary people of the time. Narratives by accomplished author Siân Lewis are presented in neat, well-bound books with text alternating with colour plates which set the context and provide a wealth of visual detail to explore. Teachers will welcome an addition to Curriculum Cymreig resources; youngsters in Wales will welcome attractive and readable books which enable them to travel through time and appreciate what it was like to witness and be part of historical happenings whilst youngsters everywhere will empathize with the hero or heroine and enjoy the excitement and tension.

‘That day, even though I am Welsh, I wanted to be a soldier of the King of England,’ is the surprising first line of the story of ten year old Rhys, one of the down-trodden inhabitants of the land outside the English garrison town of Harlech. With a light but precise touch the writer intertwines details of the treatment of the native population with the naïve boy’s perspective. His personal ambition can be fulfilled if Rhys uses what he sees from his vantage point at the beginning of the book, but will he betray the man who could one day lead his people to freedom from the English invaders?

Realistic but vibrant illustrations by James Field provide geographic, architectural and social detail, with intensity of tone as well as physical characterisation and facial expression being used carefully to imply mood. Grim anxiety, tension and joy, the menace and solidity of the castle and armoured soldiers and the visual excitement of tournament tents and heraldry are all here.