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Walks from the Welsh Highland Railway - Part 1. Caernarfon to Rhyd-Ddu

Manylion a Disgrifiad y Llyfr | Book Details & Description

  • ISBN: 9781845241179
  • Author: Dave Salter, Dave Worrall
  • Publication Revised Edition June 2009
  • Format: Paperback, 183x121 mm, 96 pages

Gwales Description
An interesting collection of walks varying in difficulty using the recently re-opened trains and stations of the Welsh Highland Railway to link the starts and finishes. Comprising clear directions and maps, with valuable information about sites of local interest, history, legends and famous personalities connected with the area.

Gwales Review
This a handy, pocket-sized book, one of the many 'Walk with History' guides published by Gwasg Carreg Gwalch. The re-opening of the Welsh Highland Railway - so long anticipated that a generation of children has grown up since it was first mooted - is very welcome. Each walk from its stations and request halts is preceded by an historical account of the area and interesting places to see. Don't be put off by the first walk which sounds a bit dull, although it includes the Roman fort at Caernarfon which is worth seeing. After that the walks are much more interesting. Very detailed instructions are given and a sketch-map is supplied for each one, although the use of an Ordnance Survey map is also recommended.

There are twelve walks altogether, and the first six are shown on a sketch-map opposite Walk 1 in Caernarfon while the second group appear on a map hidden away on page 62. The walks offer an opportunity to discover Welsh heritage beyond the more obvious sites such as Caernarfon Castle and Segontium. For instance, during Walk 3 you can visit an exhibition dedicated to the 'Welsh Explorer', John Evans, who sought to discover the Indian descendants of Prince Madog's expedition - credited with voyaging to America in the twelfth century. Walk 5, from Waunfawr, is a literary pilgrimage in the footsteps of Welsh novelist Kate Roberts, several of whose gritty novels have been translated into English. On another you can see the ancient boundary marking the summer grazing lands of the Princes of Gwynedd.

You can also reach Snowdon's summit from the Welsh Highland Railway (Walk 10). The book is dedicated to the quarrymen who once laboured here, although their quarries have long been abandoned. There is a list of books for further reading though only titles and authors are given, no dates of publication. There are thirty-five black and white plates.

Although there are a considerable number of guidebooks to the area, it must be said that this one includes a number of interesting stories not available elsewhere. Riding the 'Great Little Trains of Wales' through our spectacular scenery is always an unforgettable experience, but this small book will double the pleasure.

Sue Passmore